Embarrassing Error #7

Television News Ticker Error

By Annette Rey

While watching the news and reading the written news ticker across the bottom of the screen, I lost all interest in the broadcast when I saw an error.

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Stink, Stank, Stunk

Funny Sounding Verbs

By Annette Rey

How often do you hear anyone say stank? It’s one of those words people think sound quirky, like it’s not a real word at all. People usually say, “The place really stunk!” I guess that’s okay among friends, in informal conversation.

But, as a writer, you need to show a higher level of education. You need to sound credible. You need to know the correct tense of a word to use in your sentences.

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Wildly vs. Widely

SO Commonly Confused

By Annette Rey

This particular misuse occurs frequently, on all kinds of platforms of television programs, radio, and in daily conversation. Recently I heard it on a commercial. Curious?

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Beating Writer’s Block, Again!

Easy-peasy

By Annette Rey

There are lots of writing prompts out there and most are good ideas if you follow up on them. They range from one word, one picture, to a sentence, or a paragraph in length. If you are having trouble getting started, here is a type of hint that gives information without restriction. It should provide you with a bit more wriggle room to begin a story.

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What is the Subject of Your Sentence?

Avoid Confusion for Your Listener

By Annette Rey

I think like a writer and I can’t turn it off; so I find writing material wherever life takes me.

While waiting at a cemetery for a funeral director, I overheard an employee attempt to direct a person to a particular grave section. The words she chose left me confused and it took me some moments to make sense of what she said.

This is what I heard.

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Literal vs. Figurative

Little Things Mean A Lot

By Annette Rey

Writers do so much to avoid making mistakes in their writing. They dread seeing a mistake in a final piece of work in black and white on the web or on paper. Writers have to juggle rules of grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word usage, plot, scene, theme, and more.

With all this on their minds, simple errors can be committed.

Let’s look at the words literal and figurative, both adjectives.

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Getting Rid of He Said, She Said

Well, Mostly

By Annette Rey

Writing groups on Facebook are full of people asking simple and complex questions related to their works in progress. The other day someone posed the question about dialogue. “What do you do to avoid using he said, she said? How do you designate which character is speaking?”

This post gives expert writing tips and advice on this important question and gives dialogue examples without using the word said.

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