Writers Overuse Expletives

Use Fleshy Words Instead

By Annette Rey

There was a time when using an expletive lent drama and shock to a piece of writing. The script for the movie Gone With the Wind shocked the audience when Rhett Butler said to Scarlett O’Hara, “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.”

Inclusion of the word damn was much debated, but the filmmakers decided to let it remain in the dialogue. In that era (1939), this word was explosive on film and powerful in the context of the scene. Since words such as those were rarely heard in broadcasting, the use of it had large impact on the listening viewers.

How writing has changed!

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Writing a Narcissistic Character

Details You Should Know

By Annette Rey

I hope it’s only a character you want to profile and that you have not been exposed to a narcissist in real life because they are highly destructive people for those around them.

Let’s look at a few points you can incorporate in your self-indulgent character.

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Word of the Week 5/19/18

Mode

By Annette Rey

Such a tiny word to focus on, you say? Mode? Everyone knows what that means. But, I discovered differently.

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Easy Build of a Character

Opioid User

By Annette Rey

Opioid use and abuse is big in the news now. If you have a character in your story that is an opioid user, do you really know what the related terms are; what are the signs that you can see in a victim; what are the symptoms the victim experiences?

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Sites for Writers #17

Wow! One of the Best!

By Annette Rey

You won’t believe the usefulness of this one!

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Word of the Week 5/12/18

Generation Y

By Annette Rey

Since there is no distinct dateline for Generation Ys, it’s good to get some clarity on this group. You may have occasion to write something related to this subject. Either way, you may want to understand when you are exposed to the conversation.

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Sites for Writers #16

An Audio Dictionary

By Annette Rey

Have you been taught to use words that are well-known to you? Do you look up definitions before you add an even slightly new word to your writing? These are must practices for writers. You don’t want to present work that shows you are not literate because you have incorrectly interpreted the meaning of a word.

Just as important as your written word is how you speak. The voice in your brain that you draw upon for your writing is the vocal voice you use in everyday speaking. So pronunciation is integral to both your oral voice and your mental voice.

Here’s a great site for setting your speech on the right path.

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